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Edward H. Pattison Collection

Overview

Abstract

Scope and Contents

Administrative Information

Detailed Description

Correspondence

Military Publications

Photographic Material

Uniforms and Military Equipment

Unsorted and Unprocessed Material



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Edward H. Pattison Collection, 1915-1924 | Archives of the American Field Service and AFS Intercultural Programs

By Lawrence D. Gellar

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Collection Overview

Title: Edward H. Pattison Collection, 1915-1924Add to your cart.

ID: RG1/004

Creator: Pattison, Edward H. (Edward Hargrave) (1896-1986)

Extent: 14.7 Cubic Feet. More info below.

Arrangement: This collection is arranged topically into the following four series: Series 1: Correspondence, 1915-1924; Series 2: Military Publications, 1914-1918; Series 3: Photographic Material, 1917-1919; Series 4: Uniforms and Military Equipment, 1917-1918; and Series 5: Unsorted and Processed Material.

Date Acquired: 00/00/1990

Languages: English

Abstract

Edward H. Pattison (1896-1986) served as an American Field Service camion driver and 2nd Lieutenant with the U.S. Army Field Artillery during World War I.  The Edward H. Pattison Collection contains World War I American Field Service and U.S. Army military publications, war memorabilia, photographic material, and correspondence written before, during, and after the war.

Scope and Contents of the Materials

The Pattison Collection is particularly significant, not only for the scope and the diversity of the materials found within it, but also for the fact that it mirrors the creation of the Cornell University Unit of the AFS in 1917, and the formation of the Réserve Mallet in that same year.

The Cornell Unit had been formed as a part of the American Ambulance Field Service that had originated as a volunteer ambulance service in 1914 at the outbreak of the war, under the aegis of the American Hospital of Paris.  However, when the men of the Cornell Unit came to France in April of 1917 at the time of the United States’ Declaration of War, their services were urgently requested by the French Army Automobile Service as camion drivers rather than as “ambulanciers.”  The Cornell Unit was, therefore, the first of a number of such college or university units to volunteer for the American Field Service’s Transportation Corps.  The Cornell Unit, as a part of the Réserve Mallet, was the first to raise the American flag on the French front after the United States’ declaration.  The creation of the Réserve Mallet, named for its French commanding officer, Major Richard Mallet, thus widened the scope of the American Ambulance Field Service to encompass aid to France as camion as well as ambulance drivers.  The title of the service was therefore changed at this time to simply the “American Field Service,” to reflect the broadening scope of its work.

The Pattison Collection can be seen as source materials for a case study of a young college man in the United States during the period of American neutrality.  It shows his awakening, and that of his friends, and indeed, his university, to the state that the world wide conflict portended for the United States.  Hence, his decision to volunteer on behalf of France and its allies.  The collection also illustrates the typical sojourn of a young AFS volunteer from the time he left American shores, his introduction to the A.F.S. at its Paris headquarters at 21 Rue Raynouard, and his hard and unrelenting work as a camion driver on the front.  It is also important for demonstrating the various facets of the take-over of the entire Field Service by the United States Army in the Fall of 1917.

Edward Pattison’s decision to join the United States Army Motor Transport Corps, or as it was know, the American Mission, Réserve Mallet, and then, to opt for a more combatant branch of the U.S. Army, was typical of many former American Field Service men.  The desire of these men for U.S. Army commissions was understandable in those who had already been tested under fire with the French Armies before the U.S. entry to the war.  Then, one had to take into account the fact that most of these men of the AFS were naturally U.S. Army officer material by virtue of their backgrounds and educations, to say nothing of their previous service.

It happened that Edward H. Pattison chose to join the U.S. Army Field Artillery, and was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in that branch.  What the collection has to say concerning the training of U.S. Artillery officers in French schools, and in the famed French artillery methods and techniques, is instructive for any military or social historian.  The closeness of the Allied cooperative effort to prepare the American Army for the field can be seen in the documents in this collection.

What a soldier thought about in terms of his training, his conditions of service, his food, friends, recreation, his prospects for advancement, his ideals, and thoughts about the wider pictures of the war, all can be seen in the letters that Pattison wrote home to his friends and family in the United States.

At the end of the war, Pattison returned to the United States to finish his education.  In this, he was typical of many men who broke off their college or graduate studies to volunteer for service.  The last part of the Correspondence Series in the Pattison Collection takes him through law school and his admission to the New York Bar.  He spent the rest of his professional life as an attorney in Troy, New York.

For more information, please see the individual series descriptions.

Administrative Information

Alternate Extent Statement: 13 boxes, 1 trunk

Access Restrictions: This collection is open for research.  Cotton gloves are required for the handling of all photographic material, some of which is fragile and may be restricted from use.  Series 4 is currently inaccessible for research or viewing.

Use Restrictions: Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish material from the collection must be submitted in writing to the AFS Archives.  In the event that this research becomes a source for publication, a credit line indicating the Archives of the American Field Service and AFS Intercultural Programs is required.  Researchers are responsible for determining any copyright questions.  Any copyright vested in the Pattison family has passed to AFS Intercultural Programs, Inc.

Acquisition Method: This collection was given to the Archives of the American Field Service and AFS Intercultural Programs by Edward H. Pattison’s son, Attorney Edward W. Pattison of Troy, New York in April 1990.  Financial support for the processing of this collection was given by the Pattison Family Fund through the Mohawk Hudson Community Foundation.

Appraisal Information: No items were deaccessioned, separated, or removed from the collection.

Preferred Citation: [Identification of item], [Date]; Edward H. Pattison Collection; Archives of the American Field Service and AFS Intercultural Programs, New York, NY.

Finding Aid Revision History: Processed in 1990 and finding aid written in 1990 by Lawrence D. Gellar.  Photographic album listed under the Series 3 description was disassembled at an unknown time.  Box list updated in November 2010 and finding aid encoded in EAD in December 2010 by Nicole Milano, which was made possible under the scope of the 2010-2011 Basic Processing grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission. In 2015 Elena Abou Mrad refoldered the individual letters and rehoused all the uniforms and military equipment, creating item-level lists.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: Correspondence, 1915-1924],
[Series 2: Military Publications, 1914-1918],
[Series 3: Photographic Material, 1917-1919],
[Series 4: Uniforms and Military Equipment, 1917-1918],
[Series 5: Unsorted and Unprocessed Material],
[All]

Series 1: Correspondence, 1915-1924Add to your cart.
Please see the individual subseries descriptions for more information. This series is arranged chronologically.
Subseries 1A: Cornell University, April 1, 1915- March 21, 1917Add to your cart.
Correspondence is found in this series from E.H. Pattison to his parents concerning a Thanksgiving visit to Ithaca, competitions for appointment to the editorial board of The Cornell Daily Sun, working out for the track team, and a list of subjects taken during his freshmen year.  There is correspondence regarding fraternity rushing, and the R.O.T.C. Material is found here on the subject of work on a Hamilton, N.Y. farm during the Summer of 1916, as well as correspondence of March 21, 1917, concerning Prof. Martin Sampson’s interest in the American Ambulance Field Service.  Pattison correspondence from this period indicates that Cornell had sent relatively few men to France for volunteer service with the French Armies, while Harvard had already sent over 200 men.  There are indications that Harvard men were then helping to organize the Cornell A.F.S. Unit.
Box 1Add to your cart.
Folder 1: From Laurence L. Winship to E. H. Pattison, April 1, 1915Add to your cart.
Folder 2: From Edward H. Pattison to Mr. E. A. Pattison, November 9, 1915Add to your cart.
Folder 3: From Edward H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, December 6, 1915Add to your cart.
Folder 4: From Edward H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, January 23, 1916Add to your cart.
Folder 5: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, February 21, 1916Add to your cart.
Folder 6: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, March 4, 1916Add to your cart.
Folder 7: From Edward H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, July 2, 1916Add to your cart.
Folder 8: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, July 2, 1916Add to your cart.
Folder 9: From Edward H. Pattison to Meddy, July 8, 1916Add to your cart.
Folder 10: From Edward H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, July 13, 1916Add to your cart.
Folder 11: From Edward H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, July 19, 1916Add to your cart.
Folder 12: From Edward H. Pattison to his family, July 23, 1916Add to your cart.
Folder 13: From Edward H. Pattison to Meddy, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Pattison, 1916Add to your cart.
Folder 14: From Edward H. Pattison to Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Pattison, March 21, 1917Add to your cart.
Subseries 1B: Transport Matériel [Etats-]Unis (TMU)- Réserve Mallet, April 14, 1917- November 30, 1917Add to your cart.

There is correspondence in this series from Pattison to his family from the “S.S. Chicago” on the way to France with comments on Pattison’s facility with the French language.  There is a fine description of American Field Service (AFS) Headquarters at 21 Rue Raynouard, Paris, and A.F.S. Director-General A.P. Andrew’s May 10, 1917 appeal to the men of the Cornell Unit to join the camion service.  There is Pattison correspondence indicating the “supplies” the Réserve Mallet carried were ammunition, and that his family was not to know this.  A May 28, 1917 letter indicates the raising of the first American flag on the French front by Réserve Mallet drivers at Dommiers.  Pattison’s correspondence from this period describes the kind of work the Réserve did, the extraordinary length of time and distance Réserve convoys traveled while occasionally coming under artillery fire.  He wrote to his family on the necessity of U.S. intervention as the French were tired of the war and thought it hopeless.

Pattison correspondence concerning a permission at Evian-Les-Bains indicated his opinion that Lake Geneva is much like New York state’s Lake Gorge. The correspondence of 6 September, 1917 showed a disinclination to stay in the A.F.S. after his six months enlistment.  He believed that the quality of men then being recruited was below the usual A.F.S. standard, and his own desire to do other kinds of work.  There is correspondence concerning the upset Ed Tinkham’s removal as head of the camion section made in the Cornell Unit.  This had some effect upon Pattison’s own decision to leave.  However, correspondence of that period indicated that he accepted the offer to go to the camion school at Chevigny Farm for Transportation Corps officers and non-commissioned officers.

There is correspondence praising the French camion school at Chevigny and its program.  There is also correspondence dating from September, 1917, demonstrating that Pattison had transferred to the United States Army for the duration of the war.  Although Pattison signed as a private in the U.S. Army, there was, as the correspondence shows, every hope that he would be commissioned.  There is also much valuable information about the confusion in the transport sections between the bounds of authority of the French and American Armies.  There is also correspondence to Professor Martin Sampson concerning the doings of Cornell men in the U.S. Army.

Box 1Add to your cart.
Folder 15: Equipment for Drivers Leaving America, American Ambulance Field Service, April 14, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 16: From Edward H. Pattison to Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Pattison, April 14, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 17: From Edward H. Pattison to Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Pattison, April 22, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 18: From Edward H. Pattison to Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Pattison, April 25, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 19: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, April 29, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 20: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, May 10, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 21: From Edward H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, May 18, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 22: From E. H. Pattison to Miss M. L. Pattison, May 28, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 23: From Edward H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, June 10, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 24: From Edward H. Pattison to Dewy, June 24, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 25: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, June 24, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 26: From Edward H. Pattison to Meddy, July 2, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 27: From Edward H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, July 14, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 28: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, July 22, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 29: From Edward H. Pattison to Mard and Nell, July 23, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 30: American Field Service instructions concerning cables to Europe, August 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 31: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, August 12, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 32: From Edward H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison (with photographs), August 20, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 33: From Mademoiselle Y. de La Barthe to Edward H. Pattison, September 5, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 34: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, September 6, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 35: From Edward H. Pattison to Prof. Martin W. Sampson, September 8, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 36: From E. H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, September 19, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 37: From E. H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, September 23, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 38: From E. H. Pattison to Prof. Martin Sampson, September 23, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 39: From E. H. Pattison to Miss M. T. Pattison, September 28, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 40: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, October 5, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 41: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs E. A. Pattison (original and typewritten), October 16, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 42: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, November 6, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 43: From Edward H. Pattison to Prof. Martin Sampson, November 16, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 44: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, November 30, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 45: AFS General Letter with quotation of E. H. Pattison, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Subseries 1C: American Expeditionary Forces, December 12, 1917- January 22, 1919Add to your cart.

Correspondence beginning with December 14, 1917 shows that Pattison had been assigned to Heavy Artillery.  He chose this branch in that he believed his chances for a commission were best there as most former American Field Service (AFS) men remained in the Camion Service from his unit.  This series contains a copy of Prof. Sampson’s letter of recommendation for E.H. Pattison to the U.S. Army, and a description of Christmas, 1917, and U.S. soldiers’ help for the poor population of France in the region where Pattison was stationed at that time of the year.  There is much correspondence indicating that his transfer to artillery had been held up.  There is also correspondence from Battery “D” illustrating that he was deferred to by veterans of the U.S. Army because he had served with the French.

Correspondence from early April, 1918, is from the Artillery Officer’s Candidate School at Saumur in the south of France which had been the site of the famous French cavalry school of pre-war days.  Correspondence from this school is on the course of study, his opinion of fine French officers, and the excellence of French artillery, which he believed would have taken millions of dollars and years for the U.S. to have learned on its own, and then, not so well.  There are descriptions of the celebration of the 4th of July, 1918, and his recommendation for a U.S. commission.  Correspondence of July 18, 1918 concerns his commission in the U.S. Coastal Artillery Corps of the National Army as opposed to the regular army.  Interestingly, having left the Reserve Mallet for a more active role, he had not been at the front since he served in the Réserve Mallet, missing most of the German offensive of 1918 due to attendance at various schools.

Correspondence beginning with August 14, 1918, indicated that E.H. Pattison was then at the Heavy Artillery School at Angers and that, in his opinion, the U.S. had entered the war just in time, due to French national fatigue.  On the other hand, he believed the Americans were just spoiling for a fight.  There is correspondence showing that he was working with the French Artillery Intelligence Service at Verdun, and was there when the war ended in November, 1918.  He wrote of his return to Paris where he stayed at an old AFS hangout, the Hotel Montana, and his feeling about the war and its end.  There is also correspondence for January, 1919, from the historic city of Carcassonne and his desire to see the Statue of Liberty and American shores once more.

Box 1Add to your cart.
Folder 46: From Prof. Martin Sampson to the US Army, December 12, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 47: From Sgt. Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, December 14, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 48: From Edward H. Pattison to Prof. Martin W. Sampson, December 17, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 49: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, December 18, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 50: From Prof. Martin Sampson to the US Army, December 21, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 51: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, December 26, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 52: From Henry Warren to the US Army and Letter from Warren to E. A. Pattison, December 27, 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 53: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, January 10, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 54: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, January 20, 1918Add to your cart.
The letter is dated January 20, 1917, but it should be dated January 20, 1918
Folder 55: From Sgt. Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. Norton, February 8, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 56: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, February 8, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 57: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, March 2, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 58: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, March 11, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 59: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, March 19, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 60: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. O. T. Paine, March 25, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 61: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, March 26, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 62: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, April 3, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 63: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, April 11, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 64: Telegram, April 15, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 65: From Edward H. Pattison to Mr. E. A. Pattison, April 19, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 66: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, April 30, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 67: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, May 5, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 68: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, May 12, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 69: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, May 21, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 70: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison (original and typewritten), May 27, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 71: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, June 9, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 72: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, June 16, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 73: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, June 23, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 74: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, July 7, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 75: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison (original and typewritten), July 11, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 76: From E. H. Pattison to Dewey Sampson, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 77: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, July 18, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 78: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, July 28, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 79: From E. H. Pattison to Dewey Sampson, August 3, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 80: From E. H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, August 14, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 81: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, August 18, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 82: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, August 28, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 83: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, September 6, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 84: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, September 9, 1918Add to your cart.
Box 2Add to your cart.
Folder 1: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, September 12, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 2: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, September 23, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 3: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, October 2, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 4: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, October 4, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 5: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, October 15, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 6: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, October 22, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 7: From E. H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, November 10, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 8: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, November 16, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 9: From E. H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, November 24, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 10: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison (Original and typewritten), December 9, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 11: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison (Original and typewritten), December 23, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 12: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison (Original and typewritten), December 28, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 13: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison (Original and typewritten), January 22, 1919Add to your cart.
Subseries 1D: Post-War, May 27, 1920- August 11, 1924Add to your cart.
There is correspondence in this series from Cornell University to which Pattison had returned to finish his legal studies concerning his transfer to either the University of Chicago or Columbia Law Schools.  There is correspondence from Lake Michigan where he worked on an ore boat as a fireman and from which he wrote home of his plans to attend Columbia.  There is also correspondence dating from August, 1923 from Camp Ethan Allan in Vermont where he was in the Army Reserve Troop “B” of the 51st Machine Gun Squadron.  A notice of January, 1923, is found in this series concerning his admission to the New York State Bar Association.
Box 2Add to your cart.
Folder 1: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, May 27, 1920Add to your cart.
Folder 2: From Edward H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, July 30, 1920Add to your cart.
Folder 3: From Edward H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, September 3, 1920Add to your cart.
Folder 4: From E. H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, September 4, 1920Add to your cart.
Folder 5: From Edward H. Pattison to his family, September 6, 1920Add to your cart.
Folder 6: From Edward H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, January 24, 1921Add to your cart.
Folder 7: From Edward H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison (original and typewritten), July 5, 1921Add to your cart.
Folder 8: Notification of Admission of E. H. Pattison to the New York State Bar Association, January 14, 1923Add to your cart.
Folder 9: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, August, 1923Add to your cart.
Folder 10: From E. H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, June 27, 1924Add to your cart.
Folder 11: From E. H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, July 2, 1924Add to your cart.
Folder 12: From E. H. Pattison to Mrs. E. A. Pattison, July 15, 1924Add to your cart.
Folder 13: From E. H. Pattison to E. A. Pattison, August 11, 1924Add to your cart.
Series 2: Military Publications, 1914-1918Add to your cart.

Most of the publications found in this series are U.S. Army publications of the Heavy Artillery Branch, A.E.F.  Much of the material is of value in demonstrating the French direct influence upon U.S. Army training which is found in course manuals from the French Artillery School at Saumur, as well as in English translations of French works and, of course, most clearly in the Pattison Correspondence series.

Included in the Publications series are: Field Service Regulations, U.S. Army, 1914 (Washington, 1917), containing material on the land forces of the U.S., security, orders, marches, convoys, combat, both defensive and night.  There is also a Manual of Military Training (Washington, 1915), containing material on drill, guard duty, target practice, inspections and company field training.  Also found here is Notes on Infantry Attacks and Raids in the Present War (U.S. Army College War, Washington, 1917.)  The French publication, Tables de Tir, (Tables of Fire), on the firing of the 155mm gun is found here, as well as Supplements to the School of the Battery Commander, Artillery Materials and Ammunition (Paris, 1918), which is especially good on the famous French 75mm gun.  Artillery Firing Translated from the French (Headquarters, A.E.F., Paris, 1918), is an example of how French methods were adopted by the American Army.

Other materials are: Organization and Construction of Battery Emplacements (Washington, 1917), Field Fortifications and Effects of Fire (Army War College, 1917), as well as other interesting materials including Pattison’s own topographical sketches for firing estimates, ranges and fields of fire.

Box 3Add to your cart.
Bound Item 1: United States Army, Coast Artillery Drill Regulations, 1914Add to your cart.
Bound Item 2: Manual for Noncommissioned Officers and Privates of Infantry of the Army of the United States, 1917Add to your cart.
Bound Item 3: United States Army, Field Service Regulations, 1914, 1917Add to your cart.
Box 4Add to your cart.
Bound Item 1: Notes on Infantry Attacks and Raids as organized in the Present War, 1917Add to your cart.
Bound Item 2: Manual of Military Training, 1915Add to your cart.
Box 5Add to your cart.
Bound Item 1: Manual for the Artillery Orientation Officer, October, 1917Add to your cart.
Bound Item 2: Note on the Construction of Deep Gallery Shelters, October, 1917Add to your cart.
Bound Item 3: Organization and Construction of Battery Emplacements, August, 1917Add to your cart.
Bound Item 4: Tables de Tir du Canon de 155mm C. M.le 1915 Schneider, December 20, 1916Add to your cart.
Box 6Add to your cart.
Bound Item 1: Artillery Firing, March, 1918Add to your cart.
Bound Item 2: Engineer Field Manual, 1917Add to your cart.
Box 7Add to your cart.
Bound Item 1: Practical Supplement to the School of the Battery Commander, Vol. I, 1918Add to your cart.
Bound Item 2: Practical Supplement to the School of the Battery Commander, Vol. II, 1918Add to your cart.
Bound Item 3: Practical Supplement to the School of the Battery Commander, Vol. III, 1918Add to your cart.
Bound Item 4: Practical Supplement to the School of the Battery Commander, Vol. III, 1918Add to your cart.
Box 8Add to your cart.
Folder 1: Field Artillery School of Instruction Saumur, Ammunition, January, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 2: Army Heavy Artillery School, AEF, Bulletin no. 76, Care of Materiel, March 21, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 3: GHQ AEF, Heavy Artillery Section, Training Circular no. 22, October 28, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 4: Major Cullen, Coast Artillery Corps, Group Commander's Reconnaissance, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 5: 1st Lt. S. Davenport, Field Fortifications and Effects of Fire, April, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 6: AEF, Preparation and Conduct of Fire for the British 8-inch Howitzer, June 25, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 7: Major E. W. Putney, Board for Plotting Graphic Records for Firing, July 12, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 8: Edward H. Pattison, Topographical Drawings, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 9: AFS Publications, 1916-1935Add to your cart.
Folder 10: Map - Carte Routière pour Automobilistes & Cyclistes, Environs de Paris, Section Nord-Est, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Folder 11: Map - Kemmel Hill, 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 12: Map - La Vézouse (folder 1 of 2), 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 13: Map - La Vézouse (folder 2 of 2), 1917Add to your cart.
Folder 14: Map - Fort Sill Military Reservation (Oklahoma), 1923Add to your cart.
Box 9Add to your cart.
Folder 1: US Army Heavy Artillery School Lectures (Folder 1 of 2), 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 2: US Army Heavy Artillery School Lectures (Folder 2 of 2), 1918Add to your cart.
Folder 3: Announcement of Army Correspondence Courses, 1922-1923Add to your cart.
Folder 4: Chief of Field Artillery Informational Bulletins, 1919-1922Add to your cart.
Series 3: Photographic Material, 1917-1919Add to your cart.

This series is composed of one small album, 4 x 5 ½ x 2 1/2 and other loose American Field Service (AFS) photographs.  The album is a complete pictorial record of Pattison’s service in the AFS Réserve Mallet.  It contains very few photographs of the A.E.F. period.

The album is arranged chronologically and is well identified beginning with Pattison’s passage to France on the “Chicago” in April, 1917, and includes pictures taken at sea, drilling at A.F.S. Headquarters at 21 Rue Raynouard, Paris, the Dommiers training camp of the Reserve Mallet as well as pictures of the camp at Jouaignes.  There are photographs of Captains Mallet and Genin of the French Army Automobile Service, pictures of the Reserve in action, many convoy pictures, photos of French colonial troops, 4th of July celebrations, 1917, pictures of French and American friends, and photos of Braine, Rheims and Evian-Les-Baines.

There are photographs of Pattison’s family in the U.S., as well as battery and gun crew photos of the 63rd Artillery Regiment, Coastal Artillery Command, in September, 1918.  There are also a few individual photographs apart from those found in the album of TMU 526 men and places, as well as pictures of Pattison as a 2nd Lt. of Artillery, A.E.F., and a number of photographs of the Cornell University Unit in Ithaca before its departure for France.

Box 10Add to your cart.
Bound Item 1: Photographic Album, ca. 1917Add to your cart.
Box 1: Negatives, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Loose PhotographsAdd to your cart.
Series 4: Uniforms and Military Equipment, 1917-1918Add to your cart.
The collection contains one AFS Réserve Mallet tunic with no insignia and a khaki shirt as well as a U.S. Army tunic of a 2nd Lt. of Artillery with brass collar insignia and bars.  There is also a U.S. Army overseas cap.  The collection contains one U.S. steel helmet of the standard British type used by the U.S. forces in France.  There is also a French steel helmet, leather and canvas leggings, a gas mask in its canvas bag with goggles, two canteens with webbing, a U.S. Army knapsack, 2 Sam Browne belts, one small first aid kit, German and U.S. belt buckles, and a pair of dog tags.
Box 11Add to your cart.
Item 1: U.S. Army (American Expeditionary Forces) Squad Pouch, ca. 1917-1918Add to your cart.
Item 2: Canvas Puttees (set), ca. 1915-1918Add to your cart.
Item 3: Canvas Puttees (set), ca. 1915-1918Add to your cart.
Item 4: U.S. Army (American Expeditionary Forces) First Aid Kit, ca. 1917-1918Add to your cart.
Item 5: Stirrups, ca. 1915-1918Add to your cart.
Item 6: Discharge chevron (Shoulder Patch), UndatedAdd to your cart.
This red chevron indicated the wearer was honorably discharged from service
Item 7: Overseas Service Chevrons (Shoulder Patches), UndatedAdd to your cart.
With gold thread - one for each six months of service
Item 8: First Army (SSI) Shoulder Sleeve Insignia (Shoulder Patch), UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 9: First Lieutenant Rank Insignia (Shoulder Patches), UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 10: U.S. Army (American Expeditionary Forces) Belt Buckle, ca. 1917-1918Add to your cart.
It pre-dates the war, but was probably used then
Item 11: U.S. Army (American Expeditionary Forces) Identity Discs, ca. 1917-1918Add to your cart.
Item 12: Knife Sheath, ca. 1915-1918Add to your cart.
Item 13: Unidentified Pouch, ca. 1915-1918Add to your cart.
Item 14: King Solomon's Primitive Lodge Pouch, 1926Add to your cart.
Item 15: Canvas Sleeping Bag, ca. 1915-1918Add to your cart.
Item 16: U.S. Army (American Expeditionary Forces) Canteen Case, ca. 1917-1918Add to your cart.
Item 17: U.S. Army (American Expeditionary Forces) Canteen with Case, ca. 1917-1918Add to your cart.
Item 18: U.S. Army (American Expeditionary Forces) Canteen with Case, Belt and First Aid Kit, 1910 model used by AEF during WWIAdd to your cart.
Item 19: Shell from 37mm Gun (Inert), 1887Add to your cart.
Item 20: Shell from 37mm Gun with USAAS Rooster (Inert), ca. 1917-1918Add to your cart.
Item 21: German Belt Buckle (Officer), ca. 1914-1918Add to your cart.
Item 22: Regulation buttons and replacements, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 23: Lieutenant Rank Insignia (Shoulder), UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 24: Service Collar Insignia ("U.S."), UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 25: Victory Liberty Loan Button, 1918Add to your cart.
Box 12Add to your cart.
Item 1: U.S. Army (American Expeditionary Forces) Overseas Cap, ca. 1917-1918Add to your cart.
Item 2: AFS Réserve Mallet Tunic (Khaki Shirt), 1917Add to your cart.
Item 3: AFS Service Jacket, 1917Add to your cart.
Item 4: U.S. Army Tunic of a 2nd Lieutenant of Artillery with Brass Collar Insignia and Bars (For American Expeditionary Forces), 1917-1918Add to your cart.
Item 5: Leather Puttees made by Henderson-Ames Company, Kalamazoo, Michigan, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 6: Leather Puttees, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 7: Canvas Bag, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Box 13Add to your cart.
Item 1: Adrian Helmet, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 2: U.S. Army (American Expeditionary forces) Helmet, ca. 1917-1918Add to your cart.
Item 3: Black Fabric Belt, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 4: Brown Fabric Belt, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 5: Black Leather Belt, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 6: Thin Brown Leather Belt, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 7: Thick Brown Leather Belt, UndatedAdd to your cart.
Item 8: U.S. Army Canvas Knapsack, 1918Add to your cart.
Item 9: Gas Mask, Goggles and Pouch (with Instructions and a can of Anti-Dimming Composition for Gas Masks), ca. 1915-1917Add to your cart.
Item 1: Trunk formerly housing uniforms and military equipmentAdd to your cart.
Series 5: Unsorted and Unprocessed MaterialAdd to your cart.
Box 14: Booklets, Papers, and PostcardsAdd to your cart.
Box 15: Oversize Photograph (Back from France- Battery D, 63rd Artillery C.A.C., AEF) and Panoramic Sketch (AEF)Add to your cart.

Browse by Series:

[Series 1: Correspondence, 1915-1924],
[Series 2: Military Publications, 1914-1918],
[Series 3: Photographic Material, 1917-1919],
[Series 4: Uniforms and Military Equipment, 1917-1918],
[Series 5: Unsorted and Unprocessed Material],
[All]


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